Experts Fear Earthquake-Ravaged Nepal May Suffer Another Huge Tremor Soon

Originally posted on TIME:

Another major earthquake in the Himalayan Mountains may be imminent, according to new research that suggests the 7.8-magnitude quake that devastated Nepal in April failed to release all of the region’s seismic energy.

For over five centuries, seismic tension has been building beneath the Himalayas as India gradually shifts northward into the continent. In recent decades, a segment of the narrowing fault line between the Indian and Eurasian Plates became locked by friction, intensifying the buildup of energy that culminated in the April 25 earthquake.

The good news, scientists say, is that the quake, which left between 8,000 and 9,000 dead in Nepal and its border countries, could have been significantly worse. When the stress finally broke the fault, at an epicenter about 50 miles northwest of Kathmandu, the expense of energy traveled to the east, opening only the fault’s shorter eastern stretch, according to two concurrent studies published Thursday…

View original 156 more words

10 charts that capture how Nepal is struggling to survive after the earthquake

Originally posted on Quartz:

On April 25, Nepal was devastated by a massive earthquake measuring 7.8 on the richter scale, which killed thousands and displaced millions.

Now, the Nepalese need to rebuild what was lost—most importantly, their homes and key facilities like healthcare and education. And that is the toughest part.

According to the Nepal government, the tiny Himalayan country is staring at losses estimated at about $10 billion—nearly half of its gross domestic product of $19.2 billion.

Two organisations—Global Shelter Cluster and the REACH Initiative—surveyed about 1,680 households in the 14 districts that were worst affected by the earthquake, about their living conditions after the earthquake.

The preliminary results are staggering. Around 68% of displaced households are living in areas adjacent to their damaged  homes, where access to sanitation, education, healthcare and clean drinking water is severely curtailed.

Here are the results from the survey, which show how the citizens of one of…

View original 653 more words

The economic damage from the Nepal earthquake is almost half of the country’s GDP

Originally posted on Quartz:

The initial estimates of the economic damage caused by the April 25 earthquake in Nepal are in—and the numbers are staggering.

The overall damage is estimated to be at about $10 billion, according to the Nepal government—nearly half of its gross domestic product (GDP) of $19.2 billion. According to IHS Global Insights, a research firm, the estimated cost for rebuilding homes, roads and bridges alone could run up to $5 billion.

For Nepal—one of the poorest countries in the world—rebuilding its ravaged economy will be particularly difficult after it suffered years of slow growth.


The country’s finance minister, Ram Sharan Mahat, said earlier this week that Nepal urgently needs short-term funding, while the government begins work on chalking out a long-term plan.

The Nepal Economic Forum (NEF), an economic and policy research organisation, reported that the earthquake damaged 14 hydropower projects out of the at least 23 operational ones. This means a…

View original 179 more words

Another major earthquake has hit Nepal

Originally posted on Quartz:

This post will be updated as more information becomes available.

A little over two weeks after a massive earthquake-ravaged Nepal, the struggling Himalayan nation has just been hit by another big 7.3 magnitude quake.

The quake struck at about 12.30 pm local time on May 12, 76 km northeast of the capital city of Kathmandu, near the country’s border with China, according to the United States Geological Survey. Tremors were felt across eastern and northern India.

Screen Shot 2015-05-12 at 1.17.34 PM

With more than 8,000 dead and thousands more injured after the 7.8 magnitude earthquake hit on April 25, Nepal is already grappling with its worst natural disaster in decades.

Meanwhile, aftershocks—some as big as 6.3 magnitude—are continuing to hit. Here’s a map from the USGS, updated at 1.50 pm local time:

Screen Shot 2015-05-12 at 1.47.41 PM

Journalists in the area tweeted that locals rushed out of their houses as the tremblor hit.

View original 109 more words

Nepal: Mission Update

The link below is to an article that takes a look at the situation in Nepal and how to pray for that country.

For more visit:

Was the Nepal earthquake twice as big as we thought?

Originally posted on Quartz:

This item has been corrected.

On April 25, Nepal was hit with the biggest earthquake in 80 years—but just how big was it?

Amidst the destruction, there was a spat on the issue between the US and China. The US Geological Survey (USGS), which monitors earthquakes worldwide, reported that the Nepal earthquake measured at a magnitude of 7.8. However, the China Earthquakes Network Center (CENC), which hopes to provide a similar service, measured the same earthquake at a magnitude of 8.1.

A difference of 0.3 in the magnitude of the seismic activity may not seem like much, but the apparently small differences in magnitudes of earthquakes reported by different agencies around the world are, in real-life, huge. Because if we are to believe the Chinese data, the Nepal earthquake may have been 2.8 times bigger than if we believe the US data.

This is because of how earthquakes are measured.


Scientists use a type of logarithmic scale to ensure…

View original 200 more words

Death Toll From Nepal Earthquake Crosses 5,000 as Rescue Teams Begin to Arrive at Remote Villages

Originally posted on TIME:

Rishi Khanal spent about 80 hours in a rubble-filled room with three dead bodies after the seven-story building he was in collapsed around him during Saturday’s massive earthquake in downtown Kathmandu. The 28-year-old was finally pulled out of the rubble on Tuesday, Reuters reports, by a Nepali-French rescue team combing the capital city for survivors.

“It seems he survived by sheer willpower,” said Akhilesh Shreshtha, a doctor who treated him, after it appeared that Khanal had no access to food or water for three days and escaped with nothing but a possible broken leg.

Khanal’s rescue was a heartening but rare story from the devastation in Nepal, where a 7.8-magnitude earthquake over the weekend killed more than 5,000 people. That toll is sure to rise significantly as rescue teams move away from Kathmandu, which they began to do early Wednesday, and reach devastated villages near the quake’s epicenter.

[time-gallery id=”3835855″]

View original 271 more words