Religion is alive and well in Australia. Christianity on the other hand is not doing anywhere near as well.

If Christianity is to be measured by the Bible and not by mass opinion in churches (or by some other measure such as professing Christians, etc), the Australian experience of Christianity is not too good at all. In fact, most of what goes by the name of ‘Christian’ is anything but Christian in the Biblical sense.

Automatically I would count out all the usual cults and heretical groups, such as the Mormons and Jehovah’s Witnesses. There is of course a possibility that some within the confines of such heretical groups are indeed saved, but it is difficult to believe that any such true believers would willingly stay inside groups of these types.

Roman Catholicism is often viewed as a legitimate part of historical Christianity, but this is far from the case. Indeed, Roman Catholicism is another grouping that belongs within the category of being a cult. Certainly that is my opinion and this is the historical opinion of Evangelical Christianity and Protestantism.

Sadly, it has been my growing experience that many who profess Christianity, see Roman Catholicism as just another stream of true Christianity. Certainly these people cannot agree with some of the teachings of Rome, but none-the-less they view Roman Catholicism as just another legitimate stream of Christianity that is a bit divergent from Protestantism. These people think that unity with Rome wouldn’t be such a bad thing, even if we can’t agree on anything.

It is disappointing to note that a number of people within the Reformed camp also agree with such sentiment regarding Roman Catholicism. I am stunned by how quickly these people forget the past and the truths that the Reformation sought to establish once again as being the true backbone of Christianity.

Leaving the Roman Catholics aside, let me briefly comment on Protestantism in Australia. There is a good section within this grouping (which would include Anglicans, Presbyterians, Baptists, Uniting, etc) that would be equally happy within the Roman Catholic communion and it would be better for Protestantism if they were. These people are merely nominal at best and quite openly hold to Papist ideals and teachings. Let Rome have them if they will not cast off their heretical ideas and take hold of Christ and His teachings.

The majority of Protestants these days are not of the breed of Protestants that brought Protestantism into being. They no longer hold to the Scriptures as being the standard of belief, faith and practice. These days Protestantism is ruled by the leading of sentimentalism, mediocrity and pragmatism, being concerned more for religion and obtaining numbers within the building, rather than Biblical Christianity and salvation of the lost through the proclamation of the Biblical Gospel. This then is the Christianity of today within Australia.

I know of people raised in Christian homes and churches that are openly embracing heresy, believing that they have been misled from their youth. Such expressions of Christianity are being broadcast over social networks, as ever increasing numbers fall victim to every wind of doctrine as a result of poor or even no teaching within churches, having become the victims of chatter from the pulpits that comes nowhere close to being the preaching that the Bible expects to be delivered (if indeed preaching and teaching are regarded as being necessary at all within the church concerned).

In the Reformed churches there are varying issues that are robbing the movement of its potential power to transform the country through the truth that it possesses. There are problems with Lording it over the church and being caught up on matters of lesser importance (if they are indeed important at all), of attempting to match it with the general malaise of religion (but in a more covert manner while trying to maintain the reformed name) and simply imbibing the mediocrity of religion surrounding the churches.

We are in a bad way in Australia and we need God given revival (as opposed to what goes by the name revival in cranked up programs and services throughout the country). We need God given preachers who will preach God given truth with God given power and God given life. We need to go back to Bible basics before religion is nothing more than a man-made shell (if we haven’t already reached that point) and true Christianity is extinct in this country.


On ‘Good Friday’ the fish markets of the so-called ‘Christian World’ are never busier (and during the days leading up to Good Friday), as the many traditionalists get their fish for their meals on Good Friday. Red meat is not eaten. So why this tradition – especially by those among us (the majority) who state they reject Christianity or who reject it by their behaviour?

Firstly, hypocrisy is a major factor here. Many of these people are simply hypocrites. They want nothing to do with Jesus Christ, Christianity or the Church, yet feel that they are being good ‘Christians’ by not eating red meat on Good Friday. This little tradition will ensure their position of being ‘OK,’ especially if Christianity should prove to be correct. This tradition will ensure they are still ‘good enough’ for heaven, etc.

Why Protestants should engage in a Roman Catholic practice is completely ridiculous. This eating of fish is supposed to be an act of penance – which is just another invention of that heretical church. The Bible says nothing of such a practice – it is the mere invention of men.

I find this practice by Evangelicals (especially those that are Reformed) to be quite repulsive and is yet another slide to a mere nominal all-inclusive Christianity, that has lost its grounding.

Much could be said about the entire Easter fiasco and its place alongside Biblical Christianity (or rather its lack of place), along with other pagan and papist ceremonies that have found their way into ‘Christianity’ over the centuries.

Me – I ate a cheese and bacon pie today. Perhaps not a very healthy choice, but it was what I thought I might enjoy on this particular day.

Report from the Christian Telegraph

Bringing Out the Iconoclast

 Isn’t it interesting how Protestant churches seem to be doing their utmost to return to Papist ways? OK, that might be going slightly overboard ~ or is it? When you begin to think about the sorts of things that kicked off the reformation, especially in places like England, you see that the early Reformers sought to reform the church away from the corrupt abuses that were going on in it – things like the rampant corruption through the teaching of purgatory, etc.

There was also the movement to get away from idolatry, with the Roman church actively encouraging the worship of saints, Mary, images, relics, etc. I find it interesting (not in a good way) how many Protestant churches have moved back toward this sort of thing, though most certainly they would protest the charge of idolatry most vehemently. You could say, ‘well, didn’t the Roman Church also protest in this manner?’

What am I thinking of? Why is it that some (indeed many) Protestant churches have a lump of wood (a cross) set above the buildings in which they meet and some even have a lump of wood as the direct focus of the congregation at the front of the building. I remember in a lot of church histories that I have read, how the Reformers would object strongly to such items in the church, yet now we seem to be throwing them up all over the place.

You could also mention here the prevalence of pictures of ‘Jesus,’ in direct violation of the Ten Commandments and other Scriptures, where it is clearly forbidden that such images should be made. Yet how many of the them do you see in churches? They may very well be very important stain glass windows as far as historical significance is concerned, but does this make their existence any less a violation of the commands of God?

So you see, this sort of thing when I see it really brings out the iconoclast in me.