Infographic: who’s who in Labor’s shadow ministry


Emil Jeyaratnam, The Conversation and Justin Bergman, The Conversation

There were a couple of big questions before the new Labor leader, Anthony Albanese, announced his shadow ministry on Sunday.

One of those was where would former leader Bill Shorten end up after the party’s humbling loss in last month’s federal election. (The answer: head of the NDIS and government services portfolio.)

One of the biggest beneficiaries of Albanese’s changes was Kristina Keneally, who was handed the powerful portfolio of home affairs – opposite an immediately dismissive Peter Dutton – in addition to immigration and citizenship. She will also be the deputy opposition leader in the Senate.

Our experts have already analysed the chief challenges faced by the new ministers in Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s cabinet – now, we’re asking them to look at Labor’s shadow ministers, as well.

In some cases, the shadow ministers hold more than one portfolio. To simplify the policy analysis, we’ve chosen a key policy area for which they’re responsible and asked our experts to analyse this.

The Conversation

Emil Jeyaratnam, Data + Interactives Editor, The Conversation and Justin Bergman, Deputy Editor: Politics + Society, The Conversation

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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Infographic: who’s who in the new Morrison ministry


Emil Jeyaratnam, The Conversation; Justin Bergman, The Conversation, and Shelley Hepworth, The Conversation

As Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s ministry is sworn in today, we’re taking a closer look at the members of the newly revamped cabinet.

Some of the faces are new – Stuart Robert, for example, takes over the new portfolio overseeing the National Disability Insurance Scheme. And some of the portfolios have shifted, notably Sussan Ley replacing Melissa Price as environment minister.

We’ve asked our experts to appraise the performances of the ministers and highlight what could be the key challenges in their new roles.

In some cases, ministers hold more than one portfolio. To simplify the policy analysis, we’ve chosen a key policy area for which they’re responsible and asked our experts to analyse those.

The Conversation

Emil Jeyaratnam, Data + Interactives Editor, The Conversation; Justin Bergman, Deputy Editor: Politics + Society, The Conversation, and Shelley Hepworth, Section Editor: Technology, The Conversation

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Infographic: Budget 2019 at a glance


Emil Jeyaratnam, The Conversation and Wes Mountain, The Conversation

The budget bottom line will surge to a surplus next financial year on the back of higher than expected revenues from commodities, strong corporate profits and low unemployment.

The estimated surplus of A$7.1 billion for 2019-20 will be the first time the budget has entered positive territory since 2007-08.





Read more:
Iron ore dollars repurposed to keep the economy afloat in Budget 2019


How will the government spend this unexpected windfall of revenues?

Simplifying the tax system will cost the government $158 billion over the next ten years. The measures include:

  • doubling the low and middle income tax offset from $530 to up to $1,080 for people earning up to $126,000, starting from the current 2018-19 financial year

  • changing the 32.5% threshold to be $45,001 to $120,000 from 2022-23, with the 19% bracket covering incomes from the tax-free threshold up to $45,000

  • reducing the 32.5% tax rate to 30% from 2024-25 onwards, and changing the income thresholds so that the 30% rate applies to all earners from $45,000 to $200,000

  • removal of the 37% rate altogether from 2024-25.




Read more:
View from The Hill: budget tax-upmanship as we head towards polling day



Other major cuts and spending items are listed below.



Despite the boost in revenue the government expects to reach its long-term target of surplus being 1% of gross domestic product later than estimated in the December budget update.

The government now expects surplus to exceed 1% of GDP in 2026-27.



This budget, like many before it, predicts wages to increase over the next four years. The government expects the wage price index to increase from its current 2.1 to 3.5 by 2022-23.



Net debt as a share of the economy is expected to peak in 2018-19 (19.2% of GDP), and will then commence a downward trend until fully eliminated in 2029-30.




Read more:
Frydenberg’s budget looks toward zero net debt, but should this be our aim?



Government receipts are expected to climb from 24.2% of GDP in 2017-18 to 25% by 2022-23. Payments are expected to be 24.5% of GDP in 2022-23.The Conversation



Emil Jeyaratnam, Data + Interactives Editor, The Conversation and Wes Mountain, Multimedia Editor, The Conversation

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Infographic: Budget 2018 at a glance



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Wes Mountain/The Conversation, CC BY-ND

Jenni Henderson, The Conversation and Wes Mountain, The Conversation

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The Conversationhttps://cdn.theconversation.com/infographics/257/992dfa7926e7347e420475c1588b27f38e4586ee/site/index.html

Jenni Henderson, Section Editor: Business + Economy, The Conversation and Wes Mountain, Deputy Multimedia Editor, The Conversation

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Infographic: the National Energy Guarantee at a glance


Madeleine De Gabriele, The Conversation; Michael Hopkin, The Conversation, and Wes Mountain, The Conversation

The federal government today announced its long-awaited energy policy. As expected it has scrapped the Clean Energy Target proposed by Chief Scientist Alan Finkel, and has instead adopted a National Energy Guarantee, which focuses on ensuring electricity supply and putting downward pressure on energy prices.

Here’s what you need to know:


The ConversationRead more: How the National Energy Guarantee could work better than a clean energy target




The Conversation, CC BY-ND

Madeleine De Gabriele, Deputy Editor: Energy + Environment, The Conversation; Michael Hopkin, Environment + Energy Editor, The Conversation, and Wes Mountain, Deputy Multimedia Editor, The Conversation

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Infographic: Budget 2017 at a glance


Jenni Henderson, The Conversation and Wes Mountain, The Conversation

https://cdn.theconversation.com/infographics/62/b19d3bdd23f55a4a5fac93235a36393bb9515bd5/site/index.html The Conversation


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Jenni Henderson, Editor, Business and Economy, The Conversation and Wes Mountain, Deputy Multimedia Editor, The Conversation

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Infographic: what we know so far about the results of Election 2016


Emil Jeyaratnam, The Conversation; Fron Jackson-Webb, The Conversation; Michael Courts, The Conversation, and Wes Mountain, The Conversation

Australians have voted, but with the result currently unclear, how are the numbers falling across the country? This post will be updated when we know more.

As at 11:45AM Sunday, July 3:



CC BY-SA


CC BY-ND

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Key seats

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The Conversation

Emil Jeyaratnam, Multimedia Editor, The Conversation; Fron Jackson-Webb, Health + Medicine Editor, The Conversation; Michael Courts, Editor, The Conversation, and Wes Mountain, Deputy Multimedia Editor, The Conversation

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Australia: A Great Country to Live In


Despite all of the negativity you often hear in Australia about conditions in this country, Australia is really doing very well when compared to other countries around the world. The link below is to an article and infographic that bears this out.

For more visit:
http://www.killerstartups.com/startup-spotlight/457visacompared/

The Church: In Decline in Europe


The link below is to an article with some very interesting statistics concerning the church in Europe, that is using the ‘church’ in a very loose manner I should add.

For more visit:
http://blogs.christianpost.com/dear-ephesus/empty-churches-the-decline-of-cultural-christianity-in-the-west-17067/