A Problem with Expository Preaching?

I have recently come across an article on the Banner of Truth website that ‘deals’ with expository preaching, or rather, attempts to define the dangers of what goes by ‘expository preaching’ in this day and age. The basic explanation or definition given in the article is pretty good really – that of a preacher confining himself to the text of Scripture and making it plain to others. That in itself is a fairly good explanation of being ‘expository’ I think. I do however think that some other things are probably required to fulfill the definition of what preaching ought to be – such as there being a place for application to the listeners, etc.

My point of disagreement with the article in question, is that of the need to issue a ‘caution’ to what goes by expository preaching today, which according to the article is the method of preaching through a passage or a book of Scripture week by week. I have no issue with saying that this is not the only way of being expository, but to issue a caution about the ‘modern way’ seems somewhat extreme to me.

I wouldn’t say that the ‘modern way’ is the only way to preach, nor would I go so far as to say it is the best way of preaching. I would say that I find it the best way of preaching for me, but I wouldn’t lay it down as a rule for others. I think the method of preaching used by a preacher is best left to that preacher and between himself and the Lord. I don’t think I would even call most of the preaching of Charles Haddon Spurgeon expository, yet you cannot argue that he didn’t preach in a manner used of God. So I think caution needs to be used in laying down ‘rules’ as to what method of preaching is best for a preacher, etc.

I have heard ‘preaching’ that has been systematic in its approach to a book of the Bible and it has left me bored, dry and thinking ‘what was the point of listening to it.’ However, as a person commented on the Banner of Truth article, this has probably got more to do with the validity of the preacher’s call than anything else. Perhaps the preacher is in a not so good place before God at the time of preaching also. Who knows – but a bad experience of someone ‘preaching’ systematically through a book of the Bible or passage doesn’t necessarily mean that that method is therefore proven to be a bad one. There are other variables that come into the picture.

So the Banner of Truth article is probably leading off in the wrong direction in my opinion. Readers of this Blog can make up their own opinion by reading the said article at:


Daily Readings: Bible and Spurgeon

What a great way to start the New Year with a Robert Murray McCheyne daily reading plan of the Bible and ‘Morning and Evening,’ by Charles Haddon Spurgeon. Each of these are available on the particularbaptist.com website. Visit:



I recently updated the http://particularbaptist.com web site by adding the book ‘The Story of the English Baptists,’ by John C. Carlile. The book can be found at the link below:


It is useful as a bit of an interesting introduction to English Baptist history even if you don’t agree with all of Carlile’s conclusions and comments. Hopefully it will still whet the appetite for further research into Particular Baptist history and teaching.

ALL OF GRACE: Charles Haddon Spurgeon

The evangelistic ‘tract’ All of Grace by Charles Haddon Spurgeon can be found at the URL below:



I thought it might be useful to post the link to the confessional standards of particularbaptist.com and therefore of this Blog. The full listing and standards can be found at:


Non Regular Attendance at Church

I have a confession to make ~ I haven’t been regularly attending church for quite some time. Why is that? Is it because I no longer believe or is because I have imbibed the modern idea that Christians don’t have to go to church? Neither is the case.

There is an element of social fear, the fear of going to a new church and getting ‘mugged’ by so many who want to make you feel so welcome, which a good number undoubtedly do want to achieve ~ however, it is my belief that a good number of the overtly obnoxious are somewhat superficial in their practice of ‘niceness.’ My experience has been that the ‘niceness’ is generally short-lived and is quickly followed by suspicion, jealousy, etc.

But the main reason I haven’t regularly attended church is my inability to find a church that satisfies my strong desire to find a ‘Biblically sound church.’ I describe myself as a ‘Particular Baptist,’ which isn’t a way of saying I’m better than everyone else, but that I have a name that describes my belief system and differentiates my beliefs from many other ‘Christian’ sects. Because of this somewhat ‘narrow’ belief system it is difficult to find a church I can be happy with.

Now there are a number of churches that would describe themselves along similar lines, however, practice falls short of what they define themselves to be ~ and to a degree this is true of all of us that profess Christianity. My problem is that I can’t seem to get close to a church that comes close to my belief system, without betraying some vital element of it.

I will never embrace the practice that sees a church cater to those who are unbelievers in the meetings that are meant for worship and the building up of the elect to the extent that everything is aimed at the unbeliever ~ there is a widespread practice in the church today that sees that which would bring unbelievers into the church as that which dictates the policy of church worship ~ it is popularised by such people as Rick Warren (and there is more to it than that).

Of course my viewpoint is largely regarded as being outdated and is far from popular. I am quite happy to leave these groups to their own devices, having failed to successfully warn churches of their tendency toward this type of thing before. Yet it disturbs me greatly that so-called ‘Reformed’ churches are chasing after this very sort of thing, while still claiming such men as Charles Haddon Spurgeon among those that have gone before them. Such downgrade practices have been seen before and these men battled it at great personal cost.

My friends, men like Spurgeon would be appalled to see the practices of the churches in this regard today and would distance themselves from any sign of unity with such groups. Such pious claims of reaching the unconverted by becoming like them is not what Paul had in mind when he said he would become all things to all men and the sooner the church understands this the better off it will be and the greater will be the number of true converts entering the church.