Paris Hero Describes How He Saved Customers During Supermarket Attack


Originally posted on TIME:

The Muslim shop employee hailed as a hero for saving customers during a terrorist attack on a Kosher supermarket last week has described how he hid people in a cold storage room as a gunman assaulted the store.

Lassana Bathily, 24, told the BBC that he was working in the basement of the Hyper Casher grocery store when he heard gunshots on Jan. 9. “The customers started running down the steps. They were screaming [that] there were terrorists in the shop,” he said.

Bathily ushered the customers into a cold storage room, then switched off the refrigerator and the lights. “I told the customers to stay calm. [I said:] If the terrorist comes down here he must not hear you.” Bathily said once everyone had quieted down, he decided to go outside to help the police. Initially, police thought he was one of the gunmen, but he convinced them he…

View original 154 more words

Myanmar: Persecution News Update


The link below is to an article reporting on persecution news from Myanmar, with continued attacks on Kachin believers by the Burmese military.

For more visit:
http://christiansincrisis.net/latest-news/1903-burma-vbb-shares-details-of-a-recent-attack.html

Indonesia: Persecution News Update


The link below is to an article reporting on the killing of terrorists involved in attacks on churches in Indonesia.

For more visit:
http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/news/slain-terrorists-identities-confirmed/

Al-Qaeda fighters turn to secretive chat rooms and encrypted message boards to plan attacks


Originally posted on National Post | News:

WASHINGTON — Al-Qaeda fighters have been using secretive chat rooms and encrypted Internet message boards for planning and coordinating attacks — including the threatened if vague plot that U.S. officials say closed 19 diplomatic posts across Africa and the Middle East for more than a week.

It’s highly unlikely that Al-Qaeda’s top leader, Ayman al-Zawahri, or his chief lieutenant in Yemen, Nasser al-Wahishi, were personally part of the Internet chatter or, given the intense manhunt for both by U.S. spy agencies, that they ever go online or pick up the phone to discuss terror plots, experts say.

But the unspecified call to arms by the Al-Qaeda leaders, using a multi-layered subterfuge to pass messages from couriers to tech-savvy underlings to attackers, provoked a quick reaction by the U.S. to protect Americans in far-flung corners of the world where the terror network is evolving into regional hubs.

For years, extremists have…

View original 1,259 more words