Another major earthquake has hit Nepal


Originally posted on Quartz:

This post will be updated as more information becomes available.

A little over two weeks after a massive earthquake-ravaged Nepal, the struggling Himalayan nation has just been hit by another big 7.3 magnitude quake.

The quake struck at about 12.30 pm local time on May 12, 76 km northeast of the capital city of Kathmandu, near the country’s border with China, according to the United States Geological Survey. Tremors were felt across eastern and northern India.

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With more than 8,000 dead and thousands more injured after the 7.8 magnitude earthquake hit on April 25, Nepal is already grappling with its worst natural disaster in decades.

Meanwhile, aftershocks—some as big as 6.3 magnitude—are continuing to hit. Here’s a map from the USGS, updated at 1.50 pm local time:

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Journalists in the area tweeted that locals rushed out of their houses as the tremblor hit.

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Was the Nepal earthquake twice as big as we thought?


Originally posted on Quartz:

This item has been corrected.

On April 25, Nepal was hit with the biggest earthquake in 80 years—but just how big was it?

Amidst the destruction, there was a spat on the issue between the US and China. The US Geological Survey (USGS), which monitors earthquakes worldwide, reported that the Nepal earthquake measured at a magnitude of 7.8. However, the China Earthquakes Network Center (CENC), which hopes to provide a similar service, measured the same earthquake at a magnitude of 8.1.

A difference of 0.3 in the magnitude of the seismic activity may not seem like much, but the apparently small differences in magnitudes of earthquakes reported by different agencies around the world are, in real-life, huge. Because if we are to believe the Chinese data, the Nepal earthquake may have been 2.8 times bigger than if we believe the US data.

This is because of how earthquakes are measured.

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Scientists use a type of logarithmic scale to ensure…

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