The Jesus Boat: Videos on the Discovery


In 1986, a long lost boat that was used by people living in the time of Jesus, was discovered in the Sea of Galilee. It was discovered following a drought that caused it be revealed after many centuries of lying beneath the sea of Galilee. These videos are about this boat:

 

AUSTRALIA: BUSHFIRES AND FLOODS


Australia is a land of extremes. We have bushfires still burning out of control in Victoria and floods across the country in Queensland, New South Wales, the Northern Territory, South Australia and now in Western Australia as well. Somewhere between 15 and 20 percent of Australia is flood affected, while something like 50 percent of the country is still stricken by drought. Some areas have now been in drought for 11 or 12 years.

Flood waters are now beginning to recede across most of the country; however there is still plenty of rain about – especially in Queensland where an active monsoonal trough is still dumping rain on Queensland.

In Queensland authorities have captured the crocodile that took a 5 year old boy in flood waters. The boy’s remains were found inside of the crocodile. The crocodile is not going to be released back into the wild and will probably be sent to a crocodile farm.

The death toll in Victoria’s bushfire disaster now stands at 209, including a fire-fighter who was killed by a falling tree damaged by the fires. The fire-fighter was from interstate and had gone to Victoria to assist in the crisis. He was due to go home the next day.

The police have stated that the death toll is no longer expected to climb much further than 209.

The official damage bill for in the bushfire areas of Victoria is fast approaching $1 billion Australian dollars and is expected to go beyond that.

Police have now arrested a woman who claimed her father was killed in the bushfires after it was discovered she was not related to the man she claimed was her father. The woman was trying to obtain $10 000 in bushfire relief money.

BELOW: Dramatic video footage as a bushfire approaches a house at Anglesea in the early hours of the morning of the 14th February 2009.

JESUS BOAT FOUND IN THE SEA OF GALILEE IN ISRAEL


In 1986, two brothers, Moshe and Yuval Lufan, found something beyond all expectations, reports Brian Nixon, special to ASSIST News Service.

According to Pastor Skip Heitzig, who has recently finished filming a documentary on the find, the brothers felt that they would discover something wonderful on that day.

And wonderful it was.

Tucked away in the northwestern shore of the Sea of Galilee, the brothers unearthed a 1st century boat, now named the “Jesus Boat.”

Heitzig explained to me in a recent interview that in 1986 there was a tremendous drought in Israel. This allowed the brothers access to deeper regions of the lake.

One of the brothers stumbled upon some wood, and after a little digging, determined that the wood was actually a boat. According to the brothers, a double rainbow revealed itself in the sky after the find.

The brothers retreated to the Kibbutz Ginasar to get help. The Antiquity Authorities were brought in. After a long, 12-day archeological excavation (the boat was kept in a preserving environment and sailed across the Galilee river), the “Jesus Boat” was put in a 7-year chemical bath (a wax paraffin, Heitzig explained) before it could be displayed in the open air.

Since the time of its unearthing, the boat has been officially dated to the 1st century. Almost 27 feet long, and over 7 feet wide, the boat was dated based upon the nails used and the construction of the hull.

Most scholars agree that the era during which the boat was built falls somewhere between 100 B.C and 100 A.D.

Archeologists state that the “Jesus Boat” is the first near-complete boat ever to be found in the Sea of Galilee, and is therefore a considerable discovery.

Though some have attempted to draw conclusions that Jesus (or His disciples) may have used the boat, the reality is that know one knows. Chances are the boat served its purpose for fishing and trade, and then when it got old; it was allowed to submerge in the lake.

Though scientists can’t determine if this exact boat was one Jesus would have sailed on, it can be said that it is representative of the boats the people of His day would have used.

Since the boat’s discovery, the Pope came to view the vessel- hoping it needed a home in the Vatican. The President came to see it, as did many other men of science and politics. For the past few years, the “Jesus Boat” has generated great interest across the world.

In as much as Heitzig finds the boat a fascinating and important archeological discovery, he also sees the boat as a picture of more than an ancient sailing craft. In the boat, Heitzig finds a parallel to the nation the boat was discovered in.

For Heitzig, the boat is a picture of Israel: a nation that was considered dead and submerged. But through His wonderful providence, God brought Israel forth in 1948. He reemerged it as a bud for a new generation, and established Israel as a nation.

In the soon to be released documentary, The Jesus Boat, Heitzig, as host, takes viewers on a journey through the discovery, preservation, and display of the boat (the boat can be seen in the Yigal Alon Museum in Kibbutz Ginasar), though Heitzig makes it a point to draw a strong parallel to the rebirth of the Nation of Israel.

According to Heitzig, “The Jesus Boat was way more than a documentary about an ancient boat. It’s really a testimony to the faithfulness of God. Through the film, we paralleled the story of a lost boat and a lost nation- Israel- both of which were “resurrected” after 2,000 years. It tells of a boat that wouldn’t stay buried in a land that couldn’t stay buried!”

“Just like the boat was buried under the shores for 2,000 years, the land of Israel was submerged – virtually not a nation – a dispersed people group. Yet against all odds, Israel re-emerged in 1948. As the prophet Ezekiel predicted, there was a re-gathering of Jews from the four corners of the world into that ancient piece of real estate. It would seem as impossible as dried bones, bleached and parched under the Middle Eastern sun, coming to life again.” (See Ezekiel 36-37).

“And yet it happened – 1948, the re-establishment of the nation. And why? Because God made promises to Abraham: ‘I’ll bless you, I’ll make you a great nation, your name will be great, I’ll bless those who bless you and curse those who curse you.’”(See Genesis 12:1-3).

Report from the Christian Telegraph

RED SKIES, MUD RAIN AND FALLING ICE


The weather around Australia was somewhat strange yesterday with a number of centres experiencing massive dust storms stirred up by years of drought and driving winds. The red centre at Alice Springs was enveloped in red enduring a massive red dust storm that then swept across New South Wales (NSW).

The far western NSW town of Broken Hill was soon enveloped by the massive dust storm and when a thunderstorm struck the town, the town began experiencing red mud rain that turned whatever wasn’t yet red, red. Later in the day the town was struck by hail storms that caused major damage around the town. A tree fell on a car and one of the pubs in town lost its roof.

In another NSW town (Hay), a shed apparently was seen rolling down the main street.

 

 

 

ABOVE: The weather in Broken Hill

ABOVE: The weather in Broken Hill

ABOVE: An approaching storm front near Alice Springs

THE HEAT IS ON … Spring has Arrived


It was only a very short while ago that my region of New South Wales (in Australia – Bulahdelah to Tea Gardens) was in the grip of its coldest winter in many years. In fact last weekend the region was in the middle of an east coast low that brought cold temperatures, torrential rain and gale force winds, resulting in flooding around the lower areas of Bulahdelah, as well as some wind damage with fallen trees, etc. Exactly a week on and the surrounding rivers are still to return to their pre-flood levels, yet we are basking in summer-like conditions, with the temperature today expected to be in the high 20s or even perhaps 30 degrees Celsius. Last week the temperature was in the low to mid teens.

What a strange time spring is with such fluctuating weather conditions. The rain is expected to return tomorrow, however, this will be on the back of the season’s first thunderstorms if the predictions turn out to be true. Certainly the ‘feel’ today is that thunderstorms arriving this afternoon would be the expectation.

With the arrival of spring comes the expectation of bushfires in the near future. Last season we had a fairly negligible bushfire season, with plenty of wet weather. However, the drought has continued to bite across most of south-eastern Australia and conditions are right for a particularly bad bushfire season, with massive loads of material just waiting to be burnt in the Australian bush. Coastal regions have had plenty of rain, but not too far inland the country remains gripped by drought and perilously low water supplies.

For now though, we are welcoming the arrival of spring and the retreat of what has been the coldest winter for many years.

Drought Continues in a Sea of Water


As incredible as it may sound, there seems that relief from the prolonged drought that has held eastern Australia in its vice grip for over four years is still a long way off, this despite the cyclonic activity of the last few days.

Though catchment areas in the hunter received up to a year’s supply of water thus far, other catchment areas have received very little in comparison. Sydney’s Warragamba Dam is still only about 37% full and many other areas remain on extremely strict water restrictions. In my region, water supply capacity is already at 100% in many areas, but our supply was already very close to this level prior to the wild weather of the last few days. The regions that needed the rain have largely missed out.

LISMORE TOURIST CARAVAN PARK


Today I began my journeys by heading for the Richmond Range National Park along the Sextonville Road. The road in was generally good, though parts where not so good.

First stop was Peacock Creek Rest Area for a look at the camping facilities. Then I headed along the Cambridge Plateau Forest Drive which is quite a good gravel road.

The Cambridge Plateau Rest Area has a very good lookout, as well as a couple of walks. The first is a very easy 5-10 minute loop through the rainforest, the second a much more strenuous 40 minute 2km walk to Culmaran Creek and then loops back to the rest area.

After this I went on to Lismore and booked into the Lismore Tourist Caravan Park, where a cabin without ensuite cost $40.00 for the night.

Having booked in it was off to Whian Whian State Forest and Nightcap National Park. This is a very easy drive. Here I visited a couple of picnic areas and Minyon Falls. Because both Minyon and Quandong Falls where all but dry (due to the drought), I did not complete the walk to the base of Minyon Falls (a hard slog of a walk). I’ll save the effort until a visit when there is plenty of water. The walk itself is a 7.5km return walk which would take about 3-4 hours to complete.

KYOGLE, NORTHERN NSW


This morning I began my travels by heading for the Toonumbar National Park and the Murray Scrub Track (5.5km return – 1 1/2 hours). The road via Geneva is generally very good, with the 500m road off the Iron Pot Creek Camping Area being a little rough, but easily traversed.

The walk itself is very worthwhile, though during my visit it was dreadfully dry thanks to the current terrible drought.

Next I visited the Iron Pot Creek Camping Area and walked a short track in the area (500m – 10 minutes) – the Iron Pot Loop.

After this I returned to the forest drive and continued on to the Toonumbar Forest Drive, which is apparently a 4WD only track. Certainly the condition of the road in certain sections ‘cries out’ 4WD only. However there was no sign to say that and I managed to make my way along the entire road (though when I reached the end I looked back and saw that the road was apparently closed – would have been helpful at the other end as well).

Anyhow, along the way I visited Murray Scrub Lookout and Sherwood Lookout.

After this I headed for Koreelah National Park towards the Queensland border and Qld’s Main Range National Park. Here I visited the camping area and did the short walk to Koreelah Creek Falls. Sadly there was little water going over the falls due to the continuing drought.

After this it was time to visit Tooloom National Park and the Tooloom Picnic Area. Here there are two short walks. The first leads to Tooloom Lookout and the second through the rainforest.

KYOGLE, NORTHERN NSW


My first destination today was Sheepstation Creek in the Border Ranges National Park. Here I did the short (2km) Palm Forest Walk, which takes about 1/2 an hour. This walk leads to the beautiful Brushbox Falls.

I then headed back to the Lions Road and headed for the Border Loop Walk (1.2km – 1/2 hour). This walk leads through a rainforested area on the border with Queensland. Sadly this area, like many others, was drought affected.

Then it was off to Queensland and the Mt Barney National Park. Here I travelled to the area known as The Lower Portals. Here there is a 3.7km return walk which took me 2 1/2 hours to complete.

It is not an exceptionally difficult walk, but it is a strenuous one. If I did it in Summer it probably would be a difficult walk. As it was it was a very warm day. In short it was a good work out.

The Lower Portals was a very good walk, though the area was very dry.

The walk is up and down ridges and valleys, until the final ridge is crossed and you descend into a very beautiful valley – the creek surrounded by the towering mountains.

From Mt Barney I returned to the Mt Lindesay Highway, passed the very impressive Mt Lindesay and back into NSW. After a short break at Woodenbong, it was back to Kyogle for the night.

I’m now booked into the Motel Kyogle for two nights – which certainly isn’t as good as my previous lodgings – but a lot cheaper at $60.60, including breakfast (which will save $70.00 over the two days).