Plinky Prompt: Describe Your Favorite Place to Drive


Vintage Car

I love driving about the place, discovering new places and enjoying the journey. I love to travel and exploring the countryside. With that said, I obviously enjoy most trips and it is therefore difficult to pick a favorite place to drive.

One of the trips I do like to take on a regular basis is up the Pacific Highway to Coffs Harbour here in Australia. It’s about a 4 hour run from here – so not too taxing.

It’s just a nice little break visiting a few wild spots along the way, picking up a few things at roadside fresh produce stalls, etc.

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AUSTRALIA: NEW SOUTH WALES – New Disaster Threatens


A new disaster now threatens Australia following the bushfire disaster in Victoria and the flood disaster in Queensland. Coastal New South Wales is bracing itself tonight for a severe weather onslaught that may last until the weekend.

A low pressure trough and pressure system is deepening off the coast, with strong winds and heavy rain already lashing the coast. The weather is expected to intensify overnight, with gales and heavy rain over the next 72 hours.

However, the weather has already turned nasty, particularly on the north coast with severe flash flooding and massive seas already wreaking havoc on the coast. Within the last hour or so it has been reported that some 4000 people have been stranded by flooding that closed many roads including the Pacific Highway. A mother and small child are missing in flood waters after being swept away in flash flooding.

A number of rivers are on flood alerts and watches tonight, from the Queensland border south to Sydney. Some of the worst affected areas thus far include Coffs Harbour, Bellingen and Dorrigo. Already some 180 mm of rainfall has fallen in three hours in the north.

BELOW: The swollen river at Dangar Falls, Dorrigo

ABOVE: Rising flood waters in Sawtell

 

AUSTRALIA: FLOOD DISASTER IN QUEENSLAND, NEW SOUTH WALES AND THE NORTHERN TERRITORY


With bushfires still raging in Victoria, New South Wales has now become a state burdened with a natural disaster. Queensland has been flood-stricken for weeks and now Darwin in the Northern Territory is also expecting flooding.

Some 62% of Queensland is now affected by flooding following weeks of torrential rain, caused by an active monsoonal trough and a cyclone. Some areas are expected to be flooded for weeks.

In New South Wales the north-western town of Bourke has received 2/3 of its annual rainfall in the space of 15 hours on the weekend and has now been declared a natural disaster area, with major flooding in and around the town.

Coastal New South Wales has been inundated since the weekend, with some towns having received their highest amount of rainfall in a five day period for over 35 years. Coffs Harbour has received well over 600 mm in the same period.

Bellingen and Thora are now surrounded by flood waters and a number of rivers up and down the New South Wales coast between Tweed Heads and the Hunter are now in flood or on flood watch, including the Tweed River, the Richmond River, the Wilsons River, the Bellinger River, the Macleay River, the Hastings River, the Manning River, the Orara River, the Nambucca River, the Williams River, the Paterson River, the Hunter River and the Myall River.

Towns affected by flooding include such centres as Bellingen, Wauchope, Port Macquarie and Bulahdelah.

To add to the growing flood threat, another trough and east coast low is developing off the New South Wales Coast and this is also expected to follow the previous system, bringing with it more heavy rain. Heavy rain from this new system is already falling on the north coast.

As these systems move further south toward bushfire ravaged Victoria, they are weakening and the potential for rain is lessening. So far Victoria has received very little rain and bushfires continue to burn.

Further off the Queensland coast there is a tropical depression that is making its way towards the Queensland coast. This could yet develop into a tropical cyclone and bring even more severe weather to Queensland.

In the Northern Territory several towns have been evacuated due to the heavy rain and flooding. Darwin also has a current flood threat warning in place.

Flood waters are now beginning to spill over the South Australian border, making their way towards Lake Eyre.

KYOGLE, NORTHERN NSW


I had forgotten this journal on several previous trips, so this will be the first trip fully recorded in this journal.

Yesterday I began my journey from home and reached as far north as Woolgoolga, north of Coffs Harbour. I stayed at a place called Rosebourne Gardens (a motel – 48 Clarence Street Woolgoolga). It cost $55.00, with $10.50 for breakfast (total $65.50).

Of interest are the travel times (especially for future trips):

  1. hour: Karuah
  2. hours: Taree
  3. hours: Port Macquarie
  4. hours: Macksville
  5. hours: Woolgoolga

For my further travels north it took a further:

  1. hour: Tyndale
  2. hours: Ballina
  3. hours: Murwillumbah

My first destination was Cudgeon Nature Reserve. This simply involved driving through the area, which is clearly an important reserve area for native wildlife.

From Cudgeon N.R. I travelled along the Clothiers Creek Road and then headed to Tweed Heads and the Minjungbal Aboriginal Cultural Centre (Tweed Historic Site). It was shut, which may have been a good thing since it costs $15.00 for adults to get into the museum.

I then travelled back to Murwillumbah and headed for the Wollumbin National Park. The access road travels through beautiful country, but the road isn’t all that good.

After Wollumbin N.P. I travelled back along the Tyalgum Road and back onto the Kyogle Road. Off this road I then headed for Mebbin National Park and this trip’s first bush walk.

Here I walked the 450m Byrrill Creek Walk, which is quite obviously drought affected – very dry indeed there. The walk begins from the camping and picnic area on Cadell Road.

When I headed off on the Lemon Tree Road for the other walk I managed to get the car stuck on the very bad road (suitable really only for 4WD – in hindsight). After struggling for about 10 minutes to move it a 4WD happened along and the occupants helped me to move the car.

Having moved the car and turned it around for me, I was able to head back up the road and continue on the drive through the park (well worthwhile).

So for tonight I’m staying at the Magnolia Manor Bed and Breakfast (198 Summerland Way, Kyogle, 2474). This was a well spent $95.00. It is a great little place.