GERMAN CHURCHES CRITICIZE JESUS CHOCOLATES AS BAD FORM


German churches have criticized a businessman for selling thousands of chocolates shaped like Jesus, reports Catholic News Agency.

The candies come from Frank Oynhausen’s “Sweet Lord” chocolate-making business, which wraps the figures in gold foil.

“I started thinking about how I could reintroduce traditional religious values into this commercial world,” Oynhausen states on his web site.

The figures at present are custom-produced, costing about $190 for almost a quarter pound. Oynhausen expressed hopes of mass producing the product and exporting it for sale in countries such as the U.S.

The German Protestant Church criticized the idea as “tasteless.”

Aegidius Engel, a spokesman for the Catholic Archdiocese of Paderborn, was also critical, saying:

“It is terrible that Jesus is being wrapped up in gold foil and sold along with chocolate bunnies, edible penguins and lollipops.”

“This is ruining the symbol of Jesus himself,” he added, according to Reuters.

Report from the Christian Telegraph

CHOCOLATES MARK 500 YEARS OF CALVIN IN A TASTE OF ‘PARADISE’


Swiss chocolatier Blaise Poyet believes he has captured the essence of the Protestant reformer Jean Calvin in special chocolate pralines he created to mark the 500th anniversary of the religious figure who made his mark on European history, reports Ecumenical News International.

“It’s not easy to represent theological ideas by using the taste buds,” acknowledges Poyet, a master chocolatier from Maison Poyet in Vevey, 80 kilometres (50 miles) from Geneva, where the French-born reformer lived and worked.

“But the key thing for Calvin is the glory of God, his excellence, his perfection. So we chose a chocolate that we chocolatiers find exceptional, rare and flawless.”

Report from the Christian Telegraph